Nautilus Lifeline keeps divers and dive boats connected – DEMA 2010 BEST IN SHOW

scubagadget-BestShowI’ve had the chance to stand on the deck of a dive boat and watch for divers to pop to the surface. I felt a subtle anxiety as I scanned the waters, looking, waiting, watching. If you’ve had this experience, too,  you will immediately understand the value of the Nautilus Lifeline GPS marine radio. Even in a gentle rolling swell it is very hard to spot divers. They blend in and are hidden behind the waves. Safety sausages help but often deflate and lie limp on the surface. In high current areas you can drift away fast. Some reports say thousands divers each year surface and cannot find the their dive boat. Some divers are even left by the boat crew and not discovered as missing until hours later. The Nautilus Lifeline stands poised to

A full demo of the Nautilus Lifeline Diver Radio and GPS

bring those grim statistics down and bring comfort to divers everywhere.

Invented by Captain Michael M. Lever, the Nautilus Lifeline is a double waterproof radio/GPS/beacon for divers. The radio, which itself is waterproof  to a depth of one meter, is encased in another fully waterproof and rugged case protecting well beyond even technical diving depths (435 feet). The radio inside is a specially designed fully functioning marine radio. But it is also much more than that.

The device has an elegantly simple and well engineered design that makes it priceless for the complete range of dive situations from minor incident to full blown emergency…from telling the dive boat, “hey! I am over here” to a one button, instant notification of your emergency

and exact position to every boat, ship or other marine radio within 8 miles accompanied by dual flashing strobe lights. Not only can the diver alert for help, he/she can also stay in contact and talk with rescuers on the way.

The Nautilus Lifeline radio is priced at $299 retail and will be available in the second quarter of 2011 to divers through Divers Alert Network (DAN), from the companies website and from local dive shops. Dive retailers can order wholesale quantities from  Dive Alert.

German company Sereq also makes a product for finding lost divers: Enos (Electronic Rescue and Locating System ) (see http://www.scubagadget.com/?cat=22). While ENOS is much more simple for a diver to operate, it is only designed to send information from the diver to a base unit on the dive boat. ENOS is a product targeted at dive charters. A diver with the LifeLine does not have to depend on the boat to have a base station and can use it for any dive, even shore dives, where there are other boats or marine radio stations in range.

We gave the Nautilus Lifeline product our DEMA Show overall best in show award because of the innovative design and potential to save hundreds of divers’ lives.

The developers of the Nautilus Lifeline are associated with charter boats Nautilus Explorer and the new Nautilus Swell that will take divers to British Columbia and Alaska dive sites.